What if you could learn Clojure step-by-step, starting from zero? Wouldn't it be great if someone could guide you through each step? What if each step helped you master the material before moving on to the next? And what if it was fun and interactive? Would you like that? I sure would!

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Extra Resources

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  • Most Common Clojure Expression Flashcards (Avery 5371)

    When I was learning Spanish, I liked to use Anki to drill new vocabulary. It’s a flashcard program. I found that someone had made a set of cards from an analysis of thousands of newspapers. They read in all of the words from the newspapers, counted them up, and figured out what the most common words were. The top 1000 made it into the deck.

    It turns out that this is a very good strategy for learning words. Word frequency follows a hockey stick distribution. The most common words are used so much more than the less common words. For instance, the 100 most common English words make up more than 50% of text. If you’ve got limited time, you should learn those most common words first.

    I did an analysis of lots of GitHub projects to find these top 100 expressions. I think the results show that learning the most common 100 expressions will have an outsized usefulness. If you’re interested in learning Clojure, you should begin with those. I’ve created flashcards in PDF form that you can print, and also a CSV version that you can import into Anki for spaced repetition.

  • Most Common Clojure Expression Flashcards with Grid (Avery 5371)

    When I was learning Spanish, I liked to use Anki to drill new vocabulary. It’s a flashcard program. I found that someone had made a set of cards from an analysis of thousands of newspapers. They read in all of the words from the newspapers, counted them up, and figured out what the most common words were. The top 1000 made it into the deck.

    It turns out that this is a very good strategy for learning words. Word frequency follows a hockey stick distribution. The most common words are used so much more than the less common words. For instance, the 100 most common English words make up more than 50% of text. If you’ve got limited time, you should learn those most common words first.

    I did an analysis of lots of GitHub projects to find these top 100 expressions. I think the results show that learning the most common 100 expressions will have an outsized usefulness. If you’re interested in learning Clojure, you should begin with those. I’ve created flashcards in PDF form that you can print, and also a CSV version that you can import into Anki for spaced repetition.

  • Most Common Clojure Expression Flashcards (Anki CSV)

    How to install:

    1. Download the CSV file.
    2. Install Anki.
    3. Run Anki.
    4. Click Import at the bottom of the window.
    5. Import the CSV file.
    6. Adjust the options like you see them below.

Introduction to Clojure

Lessons

Video time: 01h35m

Getting Our Feet Wet
  • 34 min
  • free

This first lesson will get you super comfortable with the basics of the language so that when you go deeper in Part 2, you'll have the skills necessary to learn them.

Let's get functional
  • 38 min

In this second part, you begin working in a real project structure and get into functional programming.

Deep dive into data
  • 24 min

The third and final part of Intro to Clojure is all about data-driven programming. That's where you define a data structure that looks like the thing it means. In our case, we're making a data structure that looks like a recipe. Then there's a function that can interpret that recipe and bake it. Part 3 is 24 minutes long.