Steve Miner

Clojure/conj 2016 Speaker Interview

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Steve Miner Clojure/conj 2016 Interview

Steve Miner will be giving a talk at Clojure/conj 2016. He is an independent developer.

Follow him on Twitter and GitHub.

PurelyFunctional.tv: How did you get into programming?

Steve Miner: I learned Lisp in college, circa 1981. I don’t remember being taught the paradigm of Functional Programming in a formal sense. After many years of Java and Objective-C, Clojure gave me a chance to adopt functional programming practices in a more rigorous way.

PF.tv: What is your talk about?

SM: My talk is about how the art of juggling relates to programming.

PF.tv: Why juggling?

SM: I think programmers can draw inspiration from many arts, including juggling. Of course, the real reason is that juggling is fun.

PF.tv: What do you hope people will take away from the talk?

SM: I hope people gain some insight into the mathematical theory of juggling and how that theory might inform the practice of software development.

PF.tv: What concepts do you recommend people be familiar with to maximize their experience with the talk?

SM: I don’t assume the audience will have any juggling experience, but you might enjoy the talk more if you’ve tried to do a little juggling. If you want to be an expert, learn the “siteswap” notation. On the Clojure side, I plan to use Quil and Loom for visualizing juggling patterns.

PF.tv: What resources are available for people who want to study up before the talk?

SM: Wikipedia covers many juggling topics. Youtube has lots of videos. See also juggle.org and thewjf.com. The Quil and Loom libraries are on GitHub.

PF.tv: Where can people follow you online?

SM: @miner on Twitter, miner on GitHub.

PF.tv: Are there any projects you'd like people to be aware of? How can people help out?

SM: I’ll post some code after the talk, but most of my open source projects are just for my own amusement.

PF.tv: Where do you see the state of functional programming in 10 years?

SM: I expect that functional programming will still be considered a “secret weapon” but that’s OK because it will be used behind the scenes everywhere.

PF.tv: If functional programming were a superhero, what superpower would it have?

SM: shapeshifting

PF.tv: Thank you for the interview!

This interview is not sponsored by nor affiliated with the conference or its organizers. It is in no way official. It is simply curated and organized public information about the conference.

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